Stay recreation healthy, exercise your right to vote

Stay recreation healthy, exercise your right to vote

Much is said today about exercise as a way to stay healthy. Well, "exercise" and "healthy" come with many meanings. As 2008 is an election year, your best exercise to stay "recreation healthy" is your right to vote.

Time for a little "election year" pontification and starting from top down...

Federal:
The President does set an agenda. Also, the President does appoint some critical positions that can have a significant impact on access to public lands.


The Senate is a slow deliberative body that is prone to rhetorical discussion and seldom moves fast on any issue.

The House is a wildcard. They are up for re-election every two years and have a tendency to be more reactive to publicity issues of the day; especially, if they can turn it into a vote.

State: (this specific to California, other states are similar)
Governor: Like the President, they can set an agenda and they do have a number of appointments that can have an impact on access and recreation.

Senate: Similar to the federal in that the Senate is a slow, deliberative body that is prone to rhetorical discussion and little action. They are heavily influenced by special interests and public opinion polls.

Assembly: Similar to the federal in that the Assembly is more responsive to public opinion and polls than the Senate. They are prone to endless discussion and very responsive to special interests.


Local:
Mayor: Like the Governor and President, they do set an agenda. Interestingly, they are more in tune with the local economic issues and will seek to protect the county residents from excess liability.

Board of Supervisors: This is a mixed bag with a range of responsiveness. They are very sensitive to actions within their district that translate into economics that translate to votes.

Out of this are a couple of key points. At one level are elected officials that have the ability to set an agenda and place appointments to carry out the agenda.

The second point is the group of elected officials that are more sensitive to the public opinion that can be translated into votes.

In short, the Boards of Supervisors, Assembly, and Representatives are important positions as they are responsive to public pressure.

The Mayor, governor, and president are important as they set an agenda and place appointees to carry out the agenda.

Out of this, the local Boards of Supervisors are one of the more important positions as they have an influence over federal actions that State legislators do not have.

Federal law requires the agency to consult with local officials on management actions that affect the local economy.

So, build a good relationship with your local Boards of Supervisors; especially in counties where recreation activities occur. The closer to home your elected official is, the better accountability you will find. In 2008, as in any election year, your best exercise is your right to vote.

Just vote.......


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